Posts Tagged ‘old school

07
Nov
10

the madness, revisited.

I never imagined the chef made bandannas would ever take off.

It’s viral.

It’s the same feeling after cooking a service and flipping the restuarant 3 times.

Amazing and amazing.

First off the response – from grandmas to grandpas, uncles, aunts, mothers, cousins and all the family in between – after exposed to mise en gear, have found a relative that needs it.

Not wants – but needs.

Two years ago when I knew that I needed to wear a bandanna that I loved I never thought that someone else would too. Proven wrong with stride.

Enough back patting – what does it mean?

Firstly – the most badass cooking outfitter in Ottawa is proudly representing the mise -C. A. Paradis –  the Grandma is the entrance welcomer. 

Secondly I’ve been overtaken for the first time by etsy.com in sales versus the lets go to my locker model – Branson never had luck with that with Virgin either.

Thirdly the buzz and impact the you all have made has drawn an incredible rank of people willing to help me help you – and it couldn’t be more well received.

All of life is still a maniacs run to the loonie bin, but the guidelines are getting closer on point.

 

Have a good service,

 

j.

 

 

I’d rather have a beer with a fisherman.

 

 

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22
Sep
10

Draw like a chef!

Somethings have a way of resurfacing when you move.

My wife and I are packing to move into a new house at the end of the month, and during the process a few small black notebooks fell out of a bottom drawer – my old notebooks from working in Toronto.

This little guys were filled with prep lists, recipes, and most importantly plate sketches – each sketch had all the ingredients labeled  to aid in recreating the plate that night.  Dirty and raw all of these pages told an amazing story of the most intense cooking experience of my life.

I got to thinking about how chefs sketch out plates, how its normally very fast, very undetailed and completely illegible.  I shared my thoughts with some colleagues over a few pints at the local industry bar post service about chef’s plate sketches – total agreeance.

So why not make a game?  One person gets the paper and pen/marker and they have to draw out  a plate with the ingredients the rest of the table barks out at them – all while doing their favourite chef impersonation of course.

I found that no matter what skill of artist or cook the pictures were all the same, I also found a guy that could do a flawless Martin Yan – and cried laughing so hard.

The final product?

Its one of the more intricate prints that I’ve done but I’m really happy with it.

The juxtaposition of the half faded, stained kitchen sketched with the crisp logo/chefs’ sketch looks amazing when it’s folded up.

I’m going to wear this one for a while and think on it – a step in a good direction for sure.

I’ll have them up on Etsy soon!

Have a good service,

j.

pittsburgians don’t all like their steaks burnt.

31
Dec
09

aint no school like

churner the beurre

After several gorging of my parents’ delicious festive fare – in between full glasses of wine of course – I came across some food equipment that created a new category to add  into the list of kitchen tools : relic.  There’s no other word to describe the importance, usefulness or standard of some of the things my grandparents used in their kitchen that now reside in my parents home.  Looking some of these things over I was filled with an overwhelming appreciation for the simple machines that gave way to the creation of their electric counterparts and allowed the cookers of the world more free time to do other things, like cook more.

Gearing up for the new years’ at the restaurant I’m faced with an old school question : poaching eggs during dinner service for 140+ … how?  An imersion circulator would be the easiest logical choice, set it around 64’c and relax for an hour, grab a coffee – ice bath, reheat and crack – easy right? Well what if – and most of us don’t – have an immersion circulator?

more than one way to skin a deer

As in most things in life I rely on Jacques Pepin and his wiley antics that keep my brain on point with some very old school techniques that still have modern day applications (watch him make an omelete with Julia Childs – it stupid how good that man is) .  So a pot of water in motion some salt and vinegar and a bunch of flats of eggs – probably to order maybe a few ahead, but it’s going to be fun either way.  Sometimes bringing it back and proving to yourself you can do it old school provides more confidence to try doing it different, using new equipment and chemicals to improve on your classic technique.

This past year has been filled with all the classic technique I could muster,  but I really want to go play with some ideas in food as well as for the gear.

Happy new year everybody!

have a good service,

j.

don’t touch me cause I’m electric and if you touch me you’ll get burnt.

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